Nesting could make the divorce process easier on your children

As parents, the most important thing to consider during your divorce is your children’s well-being. Children need routine and stability to thrive. Yet, divorce is the very antithesis of this. For a child, it can seem like you are destroying the very foundations of everything they know.

Marital relations often take a turn for the worst when one partner mentions divorce. It can lead to recriminations, blame and heated arguments. Coexisting in peace may no longer be possible. Children will notice the change. Seeing their parents fighting can cause a child significant harm.

Financial restrictions often mean you have no choice but to stay living together until you finalize your divorce. However, if possible, you might consider changing your living arrangements to allow each of you to have your space. It can reduce conflict and reduce your child’s exposure to a tense atmosphere.

What is nesting?

The term nesting derives from how birds bring up their young. The young bird stays in the nest, with the parents taking turns to visit and care for their young. By allowing your child to remain in the family home, you retain stability and routine in their life. By taking turns to come and stay with the child, you maintain regular contact. When you are with the child, the other parent can stay with friends or family and vice versa. You could even rent a small apartment which you take turns to use when not with your child.

Is nesting a long-term solution for custody problems?

For most couples, nesting is a temporary measure. There are many big decisions to be made about where you will live post-divorce and how child placement will work. Nesting buys you time to think about those decisions while providing stability for your child while you settle your divorce.